My Blog

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As you’ve probably guessed, I’m a bit of a voracious reader. Every so often, a book comes along that is so good, I feel obliged to shout about it from the rooftops – which is precisely what I’m about to do about Paul Auster’s latest book, 4321. 

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My, doesn’t the time fly! It seems like only a few weeks ago that I heard the news that The Case of the Green-Dressed Ghost was going to be published, and now here we are, almost there. Which officially has me staring at the calendar, rubbing my nose thoughtfully, and wondering where the last year went. Seriously. What happened to it? 

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I usually stick to Devon and Cornwall when researching ghost stories, but occasionally I like to veer a little further up the country. Today’s tale comes from Dorset, which is on the fringe of the South-West; and I’ll be focusing on one of the country’s most atmospheric ruins – Corfe Castle. 

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I’ve read a fair few books on writing. Some excellent (Stephen King’s On Writing is a notable example), others a bit hit-and-miss. Generally speaking, they follow a similar formula – namely, ‘this is how I do it, here’s what to do, and here’s what not to do’. So far, so straightforward, right?

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Firstly, a disclaimer. The Case of the Green-Dressed Ghost isn’t that frightening, nor is it meant to be. Think Ghostbusters meets rural Devon, with lots of cups of tea thrown in for good measure. However, that doesn’t mean I don’t love writing and reading horror.

There’s something deliciously fun about creating a story that scares people. I’m not talking about gore-fests, pages filled with spilled guts, exploded heads and splashings of blood. I’m talking about psychological horror. Frightening plots that worm their way into your brain, then nestle there all night. You know the sort.