My Blog

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I usually stick to Devon and Cornwall when researching ghost stories, but occasionally I like to veer a little further up the country. Today’s tale comes from Dorset, which is on the fringe of the South-West; and I’ll be focusing on one of the country’s most atmospheric ruins – Corfe Castle. 

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I’ve read a fair few books on writing. Some excellent (Stephen King’s On Writing is a notable example), others a bit hit-and-miss. Generally speaking, they follow a similar formula – namely, ‘this is how I do it, here’s what to do, and here’s what not to do’. So far, so straightforward, right?

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Firstly, a disclaimer. The Case of the Green-Dressed Ghost isn’t that frightening, nor is it meant to be. Think Ghostbusters meets rural Devon, with lots of cups of tea thrown in for good measure. However, that doesn’t mean I don’t love writing and reading horror.

There’s something deliciously fun about creating a story that scares people. I’m not talking about gore-fests, pages filled with spilled guts, exploded heads and splashings of blood. I’m talking about psychological horror. Frightening plots that worm their way into your brain, then nestle there all night. You know the sort. 

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The South-West happens to do weirdness very well, which is probably why I moved here. In fact, you can’t move for myths, legends and creepy tales, and the area has so many ghost stories, it’s overwhelming.

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Jamaica Inn will forever be associated with Daphne Du Maurier’s novel. If you’ve never read it, I heartily recommend it, it’s a cracking read. What you might not know is that behind the great novel lies a very real, very sinister location. Are you ready to take a trip to the remote wilds of Bodmin Moor? Off we go then!